Deadpool 2

LDandF

I’ve discovered that the worst thing you can do is have high expectations going into a film. But I just couldn’t help it. And I am glad I did. Like the original, this segment of the Deadpool series was outlandish, intense, funny and zany. So if you enjoyed Deadpool, this installment won’t let you down. 

Before I get into the review I want to point out that a stunt person died in a motorcycle crash making the film. In our day and age, this should under no circumstances ever happen. It’s just a movie, people. The film was dedicated to the stunt person, S.J. Harris. I hope that producers, directors and everyone who is involved in filmmaking takes safety precautions on-set seriously. Yes, sometimes there are risks in getting shots, but they shouldn’t be life threatening. 

Also of note, The L & D Report was honored by the presence of a special guest, the filmmaker, author, musician, artist and storyteller, Frank Anderson. We had recently attended a screening of his fantastic film, “The Life of Reilly” about Charles Nelson Reilly.  It was great getting Frank’s angle and insight and just hanging out at the popcorn stand with him. 

I read a good article about movies last week in the New York Times, “Dystopia, Apocalypse, Culture War: 2018 or 1968?  The article posits that in 1968 the status quo in society seemed to be upended and films of the times like Planet of the Apes and 2001: A Space Odyssey, reflected that. So what does Deadpool 2 say about us as a society? I will just mention the existential aspect of the film. Like in Life of Pi, we love to tell ourselves stories about the afterlife. And if there isn’t one? Well that’s not very cinematic, is it? It’s always interesting to experience what creative filmmakers think the afterlife will be like and that holds true here. The story itself is deft at shifting emotional gears. From being self-reflexive, self-deprecating and hilariously absurd to hitting you with the deepest feelings of wonder about life, Deadpool 2 never misses a zinger or an emotional beat. 

As opposed to the depressed feeling around us after the ending of Avengers: Infinity War, the crowd at the end of Deadpool 2 was pumped up and almost riotous. If there had been an announcement that Deadpool 3 would begin immediately, the entire audience would have just rolled with it. Deadpool 2 is already a cult classic and with reason, this may be the only feature that can seamlessly thread references to Taylor Swift’s cats and scissoring.

 

One thought on “Deadpool 2”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s